coreboot GSoC 2014

We are excited to announce that coreboot has been selected for Google Summer of Code 2014.  As with previous years, coreboot will also support flashrom and SerialICE projects.

All the information you need is on the coreboot GSOC page and the following project ideas pages:

Students
We are in the Get Familiar period before the Application Period opens. Join the mailing list and IRC #coreboot. Start to get familiar with coreboot, our development process, and with the coreboot community. Discuss project ideas and scope with coreboot developers.
Student Application Period: March 10 – March 21

Mentors
To be a mentor, you must be a coreboot contributor in good standing (review and commit rights). If you would like to be a member, please add your name to the coreboot GSoC mentors section and signup and connect with coreboot in melange.

Feel free to contact me (IRC:marcj) if you have any questions.

Pencils down

This is it. The beginning for QiProg has ended. It has been a long and tedious journey to equip the Stellaris Launchpad for Low Pin Count mastering. The hardware is built, and it works. The software is there, although its contribution to the ecosystem is somewhat minimal — it is more of a bridge than a road in itself. The real value lies in the firmware. To the best of my knowledge, LPC bus mastering has not been implemented in a microcontroller without using ASICs or FPGAs. The vessels are here, and now it is time for the explorers to start their journeys.

Why do I talk like this is project is not over? It is not over. Although I have attained the minimal goals, there is a whole new world to explore. Integration in flashrom was one of the targets I had really hoped for, but was unable to complete. Is writing of the chip working? Yes. Is it reliable? Writing and verifying predetermined patterns works. Disturbingly, when I plugged in output from /dev/urand, the write did not verify. Some bits were simply not programmed, although the majority of the chip matched. Is it the LPC bus mastering that is at fault, is it the command sequence, or are we not giving the chip enough time to complete the operation? Will chips other than the SST 49LF080A work? Can we write a complete ROM image and boot a machine? This is the exploration phase: we have built it, now let’s make the most of it.

Time has been tight for the last month. I had forgotten to plan for the start of the fall semester, and my time since this event has been severely crippled. I wish I could have achieved more. I took the last two days off from the University to organize the last few weeks’ salad of stashed and uncommitted changes into readable patches.

I don’t feel sad, just tired. Exhausted, I have nothing left to keep me entertained but an Alec Bradley Presando cigar, which I have been saving for a special occasion. This is that occasion: QiProg has stopped being a commitment, and became a hobby, a child, something to care for. Now is the time to build your VultureProg, get the software, and start reporting those issues you know you will encounter. I’m in Houston, and I don’t have a problem.

GSoC [early debugging] closure

Time to stop coding was last week and I feel I have barely touched the surface of my original project proposal.

My biggest contribution comes in the form of usbdebug patches: Most mainboards with USB 2.0 EHCI controller should now be able to produce console logging on USB port. More importantly, one has now the option of using some low-cost ARM development kit boards as a replacement for the Net20DC dongle device. Digging into ARM was not really in my original plans and setting up the required environment took more time that I had hoped for.

I had the idea of collecting a trace of PCI configuration in CBMEM. Turned out I first had to do some cleanup on both PCI and CBMEM and while those have been submitted (with a minimal amount of testing) the tracing part I did not start at all. On the other hand, cleanup on CBMEM has enabled timestamp collection and CBMEM console for ramstage for most mainboards and I have a fairly clear vision what needs to be done to extend these to romstages as well.  I think there would be interest to have these features on ARMv7 too, just takes a bit of coordination and access to platform.

On the so-called “coreboot panic room” tasks I did not submit any code. I liked the idea of using some BeagleBone board as a proxy and having the possibility to switch between SerialICE debugging or GDB or pre-OS flash programmer. If time permits, there might even be some integration or interaction with radare coming up next months for SerialICE.

 

GSoC 2013 [flashrom] blog post #8

After my last post I continued to improve our flashrom build bot and it now uses VirtualBox’ safe state feature which allows to bring up and down VMs in a matter of seconds. Also, I was able to fully parallelize the builds. Using the safe state feature alone improves the duration of a full build from 4m55.930s to 2m10.496s. The fully parallel execution gets it down to 25.807s, yay.

This week I have merged a mix of old and new patches that fix a few things, add support for other things, and most importantly… gets rid of the dependency on dmidecode: I have finally committed my internal DMI decoder. Compiling for DOS and under various BSDs should be easier now, the AMD patches are slowly getting reviewed… clearly there is some progress, but obviously not enough to reach my original goals for GSoC…

GSoC (coreboot): Test interface board complete

Apologies for the late update. The design that I posted in the last post was more challenging than I had thought. However I’m happy to announce that my test hardware that I call ‘coreboot test interface board’ (TIB) is now complete. Only some of the software interface part is remaining in the project. So let me share with you a very quick update of last month. Continue reading

GSoC [early debugging] More connectivity

A substantial cleanup on CBMEM initialisation is now under review. Goal is to get timestamps and CBMEM console supported on more/most mainboards, but I do not expect to complete this during the official GSoC period, or within the next two weeks time.

One of the goals I originally had set was to have means to re-program the flash chip from pre-OS environment. It is now clear I will not have time to finish (or even start) this part of the project. The  decision to delay this part was made quite early on, actually. I learned similar work had already been developed as a combination of FILO+libflashrom, and I hope Stefan’s efforts on another GSoC project will help get this code published in near future. I might still try to get the FILO console appear over usbdebug, adding support of USB communication class (CDC / ACM) in libpayload should not be very difficult.

I have saved some of the most interesting and challenging parts last: having SerialICE and GDB run over usbdebug. Hopefully I get to report about those next week.

GSoC 2013 [flashrom] blog post #7

Nothing too fancy to report this week. I have added NetBSD and DragonFlyBSD support to our buildbot, which took quite a while: I have never set up a VirtualBox VM on a headless machine. It is quite easy actually, but there are lots of options one can configure with the CLI so that the most important/unconditional ones are not obvious at all. For example, storage controllers need to have a user-defined name given to address it in later commands, one has to specify the bus and device number when attaching a hd to an IDE storage controller (even if you don’t care at all) etc. It does not sound very problematic, but…
$ VBoxManage | wc -l
495

That’s quite a wall of text. Luckily there is good documentation and lots of howtos online.

In general it wasn’t too bad and the RDP console support of VirtualBox in conjunction with Remmina made up for it: I did not want to set up port forwarding on the remote host nor ssh tunnels myself, but Remmina can do the latter automatically on connect which is really handy.

Configuring the BSDs was way worse. Mostly because I was completely unfamiliar with them and pkgsrc, but also because they have a long way to go regarding usability. Not only that the DragonFly installer does not even try to set a correct keymap, even after installation I could not get that to work and the installer has a few other quirks that thwarts some functionality completely.

Anyway, build testing works on these hosts now and will hopefully prevent future breakage when tinkering with OS-dependent preprocessor #ifdefs (unlike before…). Next: some refactoring of the build bot and fixing issues with getrevision’s use of date on BSDs. Then back again to layout patches and libflashrom.

GSoC [early debugging] Bridging the gap

ARM is now on the table, as I am bridging the coreboot console from USB to gigabit ethernet, using a BeagleBone board equipped with the USB debug device gadget driver. At first I was a bit concerned of all the latency having an USB-to-ethernet bridge software solution on the communication, so it was now good time to do some measurements.

I used daemon called ser2net to redirect coreboot console TTY to TCP (telnet) and enabled timestamping to estimate the time it takes from power-on to entering payload on amd/persimmon with maximum logging (level=spew).

First, connecting with serial UART @115200bps on x86 host this was total of 15 seconds. Of this it spent 4 seconds in AGESA doing some SPI flash operations and during that time there was no console output.

Repeating same using usbdebug on the BeagleBone OTG port, total time was 9 seconds and again 4 seconds was waiting for SPI completion.  I would say we have a rough figure that console output on usbdebug is twice as fast as what super-IO can typically offer.

Driver compilation and patches are updated here: http://www.coreboot.org/EHCI_Gadget_Debug

To use BeagleBone some additional work was needed on coreboot side but BeagleBone Black and other ARM boards where there is no hub between OTG connector and controller should already work.

Retrofitting QiProg for the space age

In the previous two posts, I was developing a bigger issue that has became more and more apparent. The USB QiProg protocol is not completely specified. I didn’t think much of the “TODO” items in Peter’s original protocol. I figured I’ll figure them out as I go along, and I did figure out a lot of little details as I went along. Of course, none of those details related to implementing the big TODOs. So, here I am in week 11(?) with an incomplete protocol.

Last week did not see much coding. I spent some quality time with premium cigars, a pen, and engineering paper. I wrote the name of each function I needed to implement, left a blank space, wrote the name of the next function, and so on. Then, I drew the packets, laid out their structure, went through the process of thought experimentation, crumpled the piece of paper, threw it again, and started from scratch. I eventually settled on a protocol “completion” which I though was acceptable. I wrote it up in digital form and submitted it to Peter for review.

Communication with Peter is asynchronous. Very rarely do we both meet up on IRC to discuss the details in real time. Therefore, I decided to implement the “completion” protocol as-is, and modify the implementation later should the protocol change. This should keep me occupied with coding. I am very happy I can get back to coding. Working out protocol details is exhausting and boring.

It is a bit frustrating. We have firmware code to read, erase, and byte-program, yet the puzzle is not complete. I was expecting the LPC bus mastering to be the most demanding, and USB communication to be an almost transparent add-on. That would have been fun! The reality is the opposite, but, besides the aforementioned frustration, it’s still fun — albeit a different type of “fun”. It’s time to scrap weekend plans for the next couple of weeks, and kick in the overtime. Until next time, get your Stellaris Launchpads, order your VultureProg PCBs, and stay tuned. This baby is going to run smokin’ hot.